Strand 3: Global Justice

Learning outcomes

  Students should be able to…
GJ 1

 

Create a timeline to explore the origins and turning points of ‘sustainability’ and ‘environmental justice’ in human history.
GJ 2 Evaluate ‘quality of life’ in a range of communities locally and globally, past and present.
GJ 3

 

Discuss, with evidence, what are the possible root causes of climate change, biodiversity loss and one at least one other sustainability issue.
GJ 4

 

Illustrate using data and/or visuals how different ideas about economic growth and consumption impact on our own wellbeing and that of others locally and globally.
GJ 5

 

Discuss relationships between sustainability and concepts of global inequality,  inequalities of wealth and power, decision making in society, development, social, economic and environmental justice, quality of life, wellbeing and happiness.
GJ 6

 

Discuss, with examples, power dynamics that exist within relationships of charity and solidarity.
GJ 7

 

Design, in groups, a set of values and principles for a sustainable community, in a just and sustainable world.
GJ 8 Research a particular company or interest group that benefits from continuing one unsustainable practice, how it exerts political power, and how powerful opposition to ending this practice has been, or could be, challenged successfully.

Key concepts

Sustainability, environmental justice, climate justice, global inequality, social movements, social justice, equality, equity, democracy, development, environment, society, economy, quality of life, wellbeing, happiness, just transition, individualism vs. collectivity, economic models, economic growth, zero growth economy, decarbonisation, consumption, consumerism, solidarity vs. charity, empathy vs. sympathy, root causes, power, transformational change, systemic change, values, principles and sustainable community.

Example activities

  • Use photographs and images to construct a timeline of ideas and events linked to sustainability and environmental justice throughout human history
  • Create a visual problem tree to explore the root causes of a sustainability issue
  • Imaginary Island activity – students draw and imagine they are moving to an uninhabited island where they will need to agree on a set of values and principles for a sustainable community.
  • Students compare and discuss case study materials (including video, photos, text and data) of particular companies or interest group that benefits from continuing one unsustainable practice. Students research and present how the different groups exerts political power, and how powerful opposition to ending this practice has been challenged successfully. Students use the presentations to develop a campaign strategy relevant to their local area.
  • Compare the impact of climate change between countries in the Global South and Global North, under topics such as waste, pollution, health and employment, using a human development equality-adjusted index. 

Suggested resources

http://worldslargestlesson.globalgoals.org/#the-goals

https://www.getupandgoals.eu

Suggested organisations

  • WorldWise Global Schools – http://www.worldwiseschools.ie
  • 80:20 Educating & Acting for a Better World – www.8020.ie
  • Irish Development Education Association- ideaonline.ie
  • Feasta – A foundation for the Economics of Sustainability – http://www.feasta.org/
  • The New Economics Foundation – https://neweconomics.org/
  • Amnesty International www amnesty org/en/latest/education
  • UBUNTU Network – Teacher Education for Sustainable Development – http://www.ubuntu.ie/
  • Friends of the Earth – https://www.foe.ie/
  • Stop Climate Chaos – https://www.stopclimatechaos.ie/
  • Mary Robinson Climate Justice Foundation – https://www.mrfcj.org